Andrew Cooper

Andrew Cooper is the Communications Manager for 1000 Lives Improvement. Follow him on Twitter at @cooperaj

Jan 172015
 
Andrew Cooper

Andrew Cooper

Next week, Paul Gimson (@pgimmo), our National Primary Care Manager will be tweeting from the 1000 Lives Improvement Twitter account (@1000LivesPlus); sharing his working week with our followers.

During the week, he’ll be highlighting particular areas of work; sharing his thoughts on the major issues facing primary care and inviting you to join in some topical and important conversations online.

Continue reading »

Dec 312014
 
Andrew Cooper

Andrew Cooper

Over the last year, members of the 1000 Lives Improvement team – along with guest bloggers – have been sharing their reflections and views on a wide range of subjects related to improving healthcare.

If you’ve joined us over the last twelve months, you’ll have read posts exploring how primary care is delivered in Alaska, found out about the impressive work celebrated at this year’s NHS Wales Awards and discovered that Mr Potato Head can teach you more about PDSA cycles than you thought possible.

As 2014 draws to a close, we thought we’d share with you the top five most read posts of the year – and give you the opportunity to catch up on any you may have missed!

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May 092014
 
Andrew Cooper

Andrew Cooper

We recently launched the Ask about Clots campaign in Wales.

It aims to increase public awareness over the risk of developing a blood clot while in hospital. The health campaign’s simple message encourages individuals to ask about their personal risk so that they can be assessed and treated appropriately.

As we know, the major consideration for any campaign is what will actually engage people and motivate them to take the desired action?

In developing Ask about Clots, we focussed on three main areas which we believed were necessary to enable and encourage people to start asking! Continue reading »

Mar 052014
 
Andrew Cooper

Andrew Cooper

Meet Chris Hancock. He’s passionate about helping colleagues in NHS Wales to identify and treat sepsis. He wants to see as many lives as possible saved from a condition that kills more people than breast cancer, prostate cancer and HIV/AIDS combined.

Last year, Chris added Twitter and blogging to his skill set to help him in his work. And since then, he’s joined – and started – conversations about sepsis with individuals and organisations in Wales, across the UK and around the world.

Those conversations have informed and shaped his thinking on the subject. They have enabled him to tap into the latest national and international research, build strategic relationships – as well as share the ground-breaking work colleagues in Wales are leading to address the challenge of this deadly condition. Continue reading »