Jan Davies

Jan Davies is one of the directors of 1000 Lives Improvement. Follow her on Twitter: @JanDavies4

Jun 292015
 
Jan Davies

Jan Davies

Last week, a 1000 Lives Improvement master class looked at using ‘annual quality statements’ as a way of supporting improvement and celebrating the successes of NHS Wales organisations and its staff.

Since 2013 every NHS Wales organisation has been required to produce an Annual Quality Statement (AQS). This year the Welsh Government has produced the NHS Wales AQS covering the whole country for the first time.

The AQS is important because it presents information for the public  and patients about services in NHS Wales in an accessible, easy-to-read format. It’s easy to get bogged down in data and statistics, and if figures are presented without any context then it’s hard to know if they represent good performance or whether urgent improvement is needed.

Continue reading »

Jan 132014
 
Jan Davies

Jan Davies

We know from international learning the value and importance of developing a common improvement language. This helps us to communicate within NHS Wales about how we can make real, worthwhile and lasting change happen.

And that’s the point of Improving Quality Together: making worthwhile changes. Often, changing the little niggles people have every day, which they feel is stopping them doing their job properly, can make a huge difference. It can free up staff time, and make the system we work in a lot more effective and efficient.

But we also need to know that the change we’re making is a worthwhile one, so Improving Quality Together helps us to think about how we test these ideas for change on a small scale before going bigger. Continue reading »

Oct 212013
 
Jan Davies

Jan Davies

I’m so impressed with the work Aneurin Bevan Health Board is doing to put the patient at the centre of care and plan services to meet their needs.Staff are using a fictitional patient called Megan to help drive an improvement campaign aimed at reducing hospital bed days by 100,000.

Megan is a patient in the NHS, she could be any member of any family and she gives a human face to staff as they aim to improve care and quality of services.

The idea is that by seeing things through Megan’s eyes, staff can identify gaps in the systems and provide more person centred care. Continue reading »

Jun 122013
 
Jan Davies

Jan Davies

It may be that the language we use to describe issues of poor quality hide their damaging effects. Maybe ‘suboptimal outcomes’ doesn’t sound that bad. But hearing a woman talk about how she felt she had to fight to get the right care for her mother and that despite her best efforts, she feels that she failed her, casts those ‘quality issues’ in a new light. 

At our latest 1000 Lives Plus learning session, I presented five videos and chaired a discussion about quality issues. The videos told Betsan’s story – of trying to get the right care for her elderly mother. They provide an important insight from a family perspective to many of the problems we discuss every day. Continue reading »

Apr 122013
 
Jan Davies

Jan Davies

Meeting healthcare students I never fail to be struck by how committed and passionate they are about the work they do. They want to do the best for their patients and provide the highest quality care they can.

We often talk about influencing the workforce of tomorrow, but that misses the point that students are already scattered throughout our healthcare system today. They are therefore in prime position to help bring about positive change. Students are ‘fresh eyes’ on the healthcare system, and often identify opportunities that exist to improve, where colleagues who are so busy already doing the job might miss. Continue reading »

Jan 312013
 
Jan Davies

Jan Davies

I recently heard nurse lecturer Austin Thomas speak about his experience of 30 operations after barely surviving a near-fatal road accident. His verdict was that many people working in the NHS say that the patient is the most important person. But when you are a patient it doesn’t feel that way.

How can we change the way we deliver services to ensure they genuinely meet the needs of the people who use them? Listening to patients is one way that seems so obvious, but we don’t always have a good track record of doing this. Maybe it’s the fear of only hearing one point of view, which may not be enough to build a service on – but hearing one voice has to better than hearing none at all. Continue reading »