Apr 082016
 
Claire Roche, Maternity Network Wales manager

Claire Roche, Maternity Network Wales manager

A few weeks have now passed since the “Better Together” conference held on the 17th March in Cardiff which has allowed some time for reflection on our first collaborative national maternity conference in Wales.

As the Maternity Network Manager, it was a real privilege to work in partnership with my colleagues in the Royal College of Midwives and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Certainly the months and weeks leading up to the conference were extremely busy and I learnt that organising a large event takes a lot of time, requires a huge amount of planning and most importantly cannot be done in isolation! It requires partnerships and good team work and the hard work of the Programme Support Team in 1000 Lives, RCM colleagues and key network members enabled us to achieve things together.

Essentially, as a conference planning team we were “Better Together”!

During the day, there was a positive energy and a real buzz of enthusiasm and commitment. Many colleagues I talked to on the day valued the contribution of speakers such as Dr Bill Kirkup, Professor Cathy Warwick and Professor Alan Cameron. People spoke to me of the value of hearing colleagues from the RCM and RCOG present the colleges’ collaborative work together and they also valued being at a multi-disciplinary conference where the focus was on maternity care, rather than midwifery or obstetrics in isolation.

Concurrent sessions were delivered by a midwife and doctor; obstetrician or anaesthetist, standing together presenting their work. The presentations were informative, interesting and inspirational. It seemed to me that the presenters were also “Better Together”.

Maternity Network Wales is now over a year old. I feel that the conference was a little bit like our first birthday party with lots of friends! We have developed strong relationships with the RCM, the RCOG, Health Boards, Universities and many other stakeholders involved in maternity services in Wales. We are committed to building and nurturing these relationships and developing new relationships that aim to work together to improve outcomes for mothers and babies in Wales. We know that positive, professional, collaborative partnerships create cultures where patient safety and quality improvement are central to the core value of the service. Without the foundation of a positive culture where different professions value each other, improvements in care will be difficult to achieve.

Let’s build on the values of the conference. Let’s be committed to all working together to create, maintain and nurture positive cultures that will be responsive and ready for quality improvement programmes that focus on patient safety and improved outcomes for mothers and babies. As the network manager, I commit that the network will continue to work in partnership with all those that either use or provide maternity care. Ask yourself, your team, your organisation – what will you commit to?

Remember, we are “Better Together”.

Apr 082016
 
Claire Roche, Rheolwr Rhwydwaith Mamolaeth Cymru

Claire Roche, Rheolwr Rhwydwaith Mamolaeth Cymru

Mae ychydig wythnosau wedi mynd heibio bellach ers y gynhadledd “Gweithio’n Well Gyda’n Gilydd” a gynhaliwyd ar 17eg Mawrth yng Nghaerdydd ac mae hyn wedi rhoi amser i mi fyfyrio ar ein cyd-gynhadledd mamolaeth genedlaethol gyntaf yng Nghymru.

Fel Rheolwr y Rhwydwaith Mamolaeth, roedd yn fraint gweithio mewn partneriaeth â’m cydweithwyr yng Ngholeg Brenhinol y Bydwragedd a Choleg Brenhinol yr Obstetryddion a’r Gynaecolegwyr. Yn sicr roedd y misoedd a’r wythnosau cyn y gynhadledd yn rhai prysur iawn a dysgais fod trefnu digwyddiad mawr yn cymryd llawer o amser, bod angen llawer iawn o waith cynllunio ac yn bwysicach na dim, na ellir ei wneud ar eich pen eich hun! Mae’n gofyn am bartneriaethau a gwaith tîm da a thrwy waith caled Tîm Cymorth Rhaglenni 1000 o Fywydau, cydweithwyr yng Ngholeg Brenhinol y Bydwragedd ac aelodau allweddol o’r rhwydwaith bu modd i ni gyflawni pethau gyda’n gilydd.

Yn y bôn, fel tîm cynllunio’r gynhadledd roeddem yn “Gweithio’n Well Gyda’n Gilydd”!

Yn ystod y dydd, gwelwyd egni cadarnhaol ynghyd â brwdfrydedd ac ymrwymiad. Roedd llawer o’r cydweithwyr y siaradais â nhw ar y diwrnod yn gwerthfawrogi cyfraniad siaradwyr fel Dr Bill Kirkup, yr Athro Cathy Warwick a’r Athro Alan Cameron. Soniodd pobl wrthyf am werth clywed cydweithwyr o Goleg Brenhinol y Bydwragedd a Choleg Brenhinol yr Obstetryddion a’r Gynaecolegwyr yn gwneud cyflwyniad ar y gwaith a wneir ar y cyd rhwng y colegau ac roeddent hefyd yn gwerthfawrogi bod mewn cynhadledd amlddisgyblaethol lle roedd y ffocws ar ofal mamolaeth, yn hytrach na bydwreigiaeth neu obstetreg yn unig.

Cynhaliwyd sesiynau cydamserol gan fydwraig a meddyg; obstetrydd neu anesthetydd, yn cyflwyno eu gwaith ochr yn ochr. Roedd y cyflwyniadau yn addysgiadol, yn ddiddorol ac yn ysbrydoledig. Roedd yn ymddangos i mi fod y cyflwynwyr hefyd yn “Gweithio’n Well Gyda’i Gilydd”.

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Mae Rhwydwaith Mamolaeth Cymru bellach dros flwydd oed. Rwy’n teimlo bod y gynhadledd ychydig fel parti pen-blwydd cyntaf gyda llawer o ffrindiau! Rydym wedi datblygu perthynas gref gyda Choleg Brenhinol y Bydwragedd, Coleg Brenhinol yr Obstetryddion a’r Gynaecolegwyr, Byrddau

Iechyd, Prifysgolion a llawer o randdeiliaid eraill sy’n ymwneud â gwasanaethau mamolaeth yng Nghymru. Rydym wedi ymrwymo i ddatblygu a meithrin y cysylltiadau hyn a datblygu cysylltiadau newydd gan anelu at weithio gyda’n gilydd i wella canlyniadau i famau a babanod yng Nghymru. Gwyddom fod partneriaethau cadarnhaol, proffesiynol, cydweithredol yn creu diwylliannau lle mae diogelwch cleifion a gwella ansawdd yn ganolog i werthoedd craidd y gwasanaeth. Heb ddiwylliant cadarnhaol lle mae gwahanol broffesiynau yn gwerthfawrogi ei gilydd, bydd yn anodd cyflawni gwelliannau mewn gofal.

Gadewch i ni adeiladu ar werthoedd y gynhadledd. Gadewch i bawb ohonom ymrwymo i weithio gyda’n gilydd i greu, cynnal a meithrin diwylliannau cadarnhaol a fydd yn ymatebol ac yn barod am raglenni gwella ansawdd sy’n canolbwyntio ar ddiogelwch cleifion a gwella canlyniadau i famau a babanod. Fel rheolwr y rhwydwaith, rwy’n ymrwymo i sicrhau y bydd y rhwydwaith yn parhau i weithio mewn partneriaeth â phawb sydd naill ai’n defnyddio neu’n darparu gofal mamolaeth. Gofynnwch i chi eich hun, eich tîm, eich sefydliad – beth fydd eich ymrwymiad chi?

Cofiwch, rydym yn “Gweithio’n Well Gyda’n Gilydd”.

Mar 312016
 
Francesca Elner

Francesca Elner

As a member of Bangor University’s Student Chapter, I was given the opportunity to attend the Quality Checks in Healthcare event in November 2015. The event described the genesis of the Quality Checks Toolkit and a number of healthcare professionals discussed how they use it to improve the care they deliver.

For those of you who don’t know already, the Toolkit was developed following the Trusted to Care Review in 2014 which highlighted fundamental areas of care that needed focus and attention. The Toolkit has been designed to be used as a kind of internal informal audit tool to enable staff rather than penalise.

The initial event in November inspired me as I realised how far-reaching the Toolkit’s uses could be – especially for students! As a student nurse I am writing my dissertation on an area of improvement, and I believe that this Toolkit could be used by fellow students to highlight an area upon which they could focus their improvement idea.

Following the event, I was invited to become a member of the Quality Checks in Healthcare Steering Group, attending my  first meeting in January. It was such a  privilege to be asked to be involved and exciting that the Steering Group value student input into the Toolkit’s use.

Having recently been a part of an NMC consultation into preparedness for practice, I feel that there might be scope for the Toolkit to be used to facilitate the ‘student-mentor’ relationship on placements. Mentors could use the Toolkit alongside their students to show areas of good practice and focus on the fundamentals in a structured way, and the Toolkit would be a great way for students to familiarise themselves with key areas of care and patient safety.

So, if you aren’t already familiar with the Quality Checks in Healthcare Toolkit, whether you are a student or qualified professional, please go and check it out! It is simple, easy to follow and can only enhance current practice in an informal and supportive way. And if you are a student, it’s a great way to support your placement learning experience and focus on the people that really matter – patients!

Francesca Elner; Third year nursing student at Bangor University, RCN Student Committee Member for Wales, Member of Bangor University’s School of Healthcare Sciences 1000Lives Student Chapter, President of Bangor University’s Nursing Society, Bangor University’s adult nursing representative on the Wales Health Student Forum

Sep 092015
 
Liz Smith

Liz Smith

The last week of August in my diary had been packed to the rafters with meetings for a while. When asked to additionally host My Working Week I thought it was a good idea and I could use it to share my activities with a new audience. Best laid plans!

I was determined to fly the nursing flag, I’m very proud of my profession.

As my husband nicknamed me ‘Twitter HQ’ that week perhaps that’s a true reflection of what he saw: a laptop, iPad, diary, determination…and a smile.

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Jul 032015
 
Jonathan Cliffe (left) and fellow students at the National Learning Event

Jonathan Cliffe (left) and fellow students at the National Learning Event

Here’s a post from Jonathan Cliffe, Third Year Student Midwife at Bangor University giving his reflections and top take-aways from our recent National Learning Event held in Cardiff. The theme for the day was ‘Listening and Learning Organisations’. The day explored how NHS Wales is becoming a listening and learning organisation, you can see resources from the day here.

1. Importance of Interdisciplinary collaboration

This was the second time I have attended the 1000 Lives Improvement National Learning Event and in September I am due to qualify as a midwife. One of the key messages I have taken from attending the 1000 Lives Improvement workshops and Learning Event is the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration; professionals coming together from different fields of health and social care, sharing experiences, gaining knowledge and inspiring others with the news of positive innovations which result in others committing to making improvements in their own practice or within their organisations.

The theme of the event this year Listening and Learning. Doing this with each other allows for development of not only your own personal professional development but also allows collaborative ideas for improvement to be formed. I have learnt that quality improvements, no matter how small, can have a huge impact on user experience, it may just be one small thing you change but on a grander scale, that small change could be the last piece of a jigsaw!

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May 292015
 
Kirsty (centre) with fellow students

Kirsty (centre) with fellow students and lecturer Angela Williams

I was really looking forward to the International Forum and meeting people from all over the world, but I was also a bit nervous. Firstly travelling to London and secondly the questions going through my head: ‘Would I stand out like a sore thumb as a student at the forum? Would I fit in, would I know enough?’.

All of that nervousness was replaced with excitement when I arrived at the ExCel London centre where the forum was taking place. I knew that I was going to have a great couple of days learning lots about quality improvement across the world. This first hit me when I entered the exhibition hall to see stands from all over the world demonstrating quality improvement, including NHS Wales. After meeting the 1000 Lives Improvement team and my fellow students from across Wales, I knew I was in for a great couple of days.

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May 262015
 
Bethan (far left) with fellow students

Bethan (far left) with fellow students

I’ve won a competition… that never happens normally! The #Hellomynameis competition I entered earlier in the year just so happened to get me a place at the International Quality Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare with fellow healthcare students from across NHS Wales.

Having never been to London or an event on this scale before, I was slightly nervous about the forum.  I travelled down on the train with fellow student Debbie and Angela, a lecturer at Bangor University. We were asked to try and use Twitter to connect, share and learn whilst at the forum, and as a bit of a technophobe, I was pleased that Angela was there to show me the basics on the journey down – I now see Twitter as a great way to connect and share information with others, all via social media, so much so that I’m now unable to stop tweeting, it has been great to connect with like minded people across the world and I even gained a number of followers after meeting them at the forum!

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May 212015
 
Debbie (second from right) with fellow students

Debbie (second from right) with fellow students at #Quality2015

After getting over my excitement at being announced a winner of the #Hellomynameis competition earlier this year, I had to prepare myself all over again to travel down to London with my fellow student nurse winners to attend the International Forum on Quality and Improvement in Healthcare 2015 hosted by IHI.

We arrived, registered, looked around the exhibition hall and took our seats to listen to the keynote speaker Maureen Bisognano.  What an inspiration! She spoke about curiosity being the driver behind improvement and to look at things from a different angle.  She showed us a quote written backwards in the ladies bathroom at their facility in America.  Obviously no one could read it quickly until you came to wash your hands in the bathroom and look through the mirror…The quote read:

 

“By looking at the problem from a different perspective, sometimes the solution becomes clear”

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May 132015
 
Frances Samuel

Frances Samuel

From Wednesday 22nd April to Friday 24th April I was lucky enough to attend the 20th International Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare at the ExCel in London, all thanks to 1000 Lives Improvement. The event is promoted as a unique opportunity to learn from, and network with key figures and organisations in the world of quality improvement. It did not disappoint! With 3,000 delegates from 80 different countries it was a very inspirational and professionally organised event. I shared my experience with three nursing students from other universities across Wales, who were all equally enthusiastic about quality and safety improvement.

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May 122015
 
Paul Gimson

Paul Gimson

It was a real privilege to be able to represent 1000 Lives Improvement and Public Health Wales at the 2015 Quality Forum this year.

I expected many things when I went along to but learning a new word was not one of them. The word was ‘Exnovate’ and it was used by Maureen Bisognano, the CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), to highlight the real need for healthcare systems across the word to do less of what isn’t important or needed. It chimed with those of us there from Wales because of its similarities with our own prudent healthcare principle of ‘Do Only What is Needed and Do no Harm.’ The issue of over diagnosis and overtreatment was a theme of many of the sessions within the conference and so it was nice to be able to feedback to Wales that the work we are doing here on prudency is not only ground breaking but it is of international significance.

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