Nov 182014
 
Mike Spencer

Mike Spencer

Sarah Puntoni

Sarah Puntoni

Prudent healthcare challenges us to ‘remodel the relationship between user and provider on the basis of co-production’. However co-production is a concept that is often thought of in the context of service (re-)design, rather than in clinical consultations.

So how can co-production work in one to one interactions? Co-production is an approach to public services based on equal and reciprocal relationships between professionals, people using services, their families and their communities.  These are the same relationships that need to be in place to deliver person centred care through shared decision making and self management support. So, if we are able to support our service users to take a more active and confident role in managing their health and conditions, we will be nearer to achieving a prudent approach to healthcare.

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Nov 102014
 

The last time I blogged, I was talking about improving your journey to work by making decisions based on data, but I also wanted to look at how to prioritise which changes are of the biggest benefit and which are the most easily achieved. After all, we only have a finite amount of time and resources within work. How do we choose what improvement area to work on next?

In IQT Silver we use Pareto charts to see where opportunity for improvement lies within work.

David Williams

David Williams

A Pareto chart,based on the Pareto principle, states that, for many events, roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes. Possible examples of this in healthcare are:

80% of referrals coming from 20% of the population, or

80% of hospital bed days come from 20% of inpatients.

A Pareto chart is a type of chart that contains both an ordered bar chart and a line graph, where the bars are ordered from highest to lowest and the line shows the cumulative percentage of the bars across the chart. The ordered bars show how often something happens, the costs of something or another important unit of measure.

This format makes it easy to see at a glance where the biggest areas for improvement lie and how much of the whole picture they represent. This is done by looking up from a bar within the chart to the cumulative line, then across to the right to read the percentage that the chosen bar and those to the left of it represent out of the whole percentage.

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Sep 172014
 
Anitha Uddin

Anitha Uddin

As a group our Swansea University Chapter decided we wanted to support the #hello my name is… campaign, and thought that a student nurse badge initiative would be a great way to get involved. We felt this would be a fantastic opportunity for our student chapter to make a change with a big impact, therefore fully embracing the ideas of quality improvement.

Our faculty lead Julia Pridmore supported us on our project and helped us acquire the student badges that incorporate the #hello my name is… logo. This project was fully supported by Swansea University, implementing the badges for September’s intake of nurses and rolling them out to subsequent cohorts of nursing students. The badges will be bilingual and worn by all fields of nursing students (child, mental health and adult). They are clip on and slide into a plastic holder, so very safe but visible at the same time.
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Jul 152014
 

Helen Birtwhistle

I was privileged to once again be a judge at the recent NHS Wales Awards and what struck me was just how much of the innovative work being honoured had co-production and prudent healthcare at its core.

We know financial pressures mean working in healthcare is often a tough place to be but this is a time to work smarter and make the best use of resources to deliver quality, safe patient care across Wales.

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