May 152014
 
Liz Smith

Liz Smith

There was something different about this year’s Quality Forum and it took me a poster tour to work out what it was.

As an abstract reviewer, when that 5 pm deadline in November looms and my inbox becomes full, I am always inspired by the number and variety of proposals people submit. The way these abstracts are written is important; they need to make people say, “Tell me more”.

And that’s the same with the sights and sounds you are bombarded with from all the stands at the Forum. They need to grab your attention and draw you in. They need to make you want to hear more.

This year, I agreed to host a number of the poster tours. These involve moving between posters stands and giving a few minutes to each presenter to share the work they came to display and discuss, and to take any questions. There had been thousands of submissions from people who wanted to share their work on a poster at the forum, and only 700 had been accepted. Continue reading »

May 132014
 
Helen Price

Anitha Uddin

In April, I was fortunate to attend the International Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare in Paris. It was an eye-opening experience that taught me so much.

A particular idea I took away was that quality improvement should not be considered an extra-curricular activity; it should be embedded into current practice. And since student nurses are the ones who will be working in healthcare in the coming years, it needs to remain the bedrock of our education.

That’s why I found the nursing discussion session so inspirational. I met nurses from around the globe who all shared a similar vision about healthcare and quality improvement, and we discussed everything from policy and education, to current nursing practices and quality improvement. Continue reading »

May 132014
 
Helen Price

Helen Price

While attending the International Forum for Quality and Safety in Healthcare in Paris last month, I felt so privileged to be given the opportunity to be part of a global community which has such passion and enthusiasm for making healthcare better.

In her keynote address, Maureen Bisognano, President and CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, set the tone for the event. She described how healthcare is stuck in a gravitational pull of existing systems, and that to escape this requires new ideas, inspiration and collective impact. She said, “The power of an audacious goal accelerates change, bringing people together to make the impossible possible”. It was truly awe-inspiring.

One theme that was much talked about in many sessions was the importance of patient engagement. As Dr Morten Pytte from DNV-GL said, the call for patient-centred care, the 6 Cs, co-production and a collective approach to care has never been louder! It is clear that we need to bridge the gap between what we preach and what happens in practice. Continue reading »

May 022014
 
Mike Davidge

Mike Davidge

When Don Berwick features the Dalai Lama in a keynote presentation, you know something is going on.  When he compounds that by linking health to an 18th century British clockmaker and talks about being kind to one another and the benefits of charity giving, you might be forgiven for thinking he’d sort of lost the plot.

Well maybe except for two things.  Firstly, it was his delivery.  The keynote was delivered in his very understated style.  Those reassuring East Coast tones lend gravitas and are so reminiscent of Alastair Cooke – not the England cricket captain but the BBC’s long time US correspondent – and his Letters from America.  We trust this man not to lead us astray. Continue reading »

May 022014
 
Tim Heywood

Tim Heywood

The main hall of the Palais des congrès in Paris is an enormous space. For fans of trivia, it was the venue for the Eurovision Song contest in 1978. The 3000 plus delegates at the Quality Forum may have been there for a very different reason, but there was something about the design of the building and the international mix of the delegates, that kept nostalgic thoughts of the 1970’s returning to my mind (Israel won Eurovision that year, if you are interested).

This was my second visit to the Forum – my first was 6 years ago, the year that the 1000 Lives Campaign was launched, and it struck me how even 2008 is starting to feel like a long time ago. Caught in the cycle of daily work it is easy to fall into the trap of thinking that nothing much changes about the issues we confront and the opportunities we have to change them. Having the opportunity to take a step back and take a different view of your own work context was a good reminder of how mistaken that is. Continue reading »

May 022014
 
Angela Williams

Angela Williams

During the recent International Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare, I facilitated a specialty poster focus group themed on record keeping. It was thought-provoking to hear different views on the latest ways to combat the everyday issues of ineffective record keeping.

Throughout the tour, the delegates heard a range of ideas, from the small and simple, to the more ambitious and innovative. The overarching message from each passionate presenter was the same, though; we need to make things work better for the benefit of the patient. What was clear is that this issue is still problematic, and not specific to one profession alone.

 Mike Davidge and me at the Quality Forum

Mike Davidge and me at the Quality Forum

Continue reading »