Jan 172015
 
Andrew Cooper

Andrew Cooper

Next week, Paul Gimson (@pgimmo), our National Primary Care Manager will be tweeting from the 1000 Lives Improvement Twitter account (@1000LivesPlus); sharing his working week with our followers.

During the week, he’ll be highlighting particular areas of work; sharing his thoughts on the major issues facing primary care and inviting you to join in some topical and important conversations online.

Continue reading »

May 022014
 
Tim Heywood

Tim Heywood

The main hall of the Palais des congrès in Paris is an enormous space. For fans of trivia, it was the venue for the Eurovision Song contest in 1978. The 3000 plus delegates at the Quality Forum may have been there for a very different reason, but there was something about the design of the building and the international mix of the delegates, that kept nostalgic thoughts of the 1970’s returning to my mind (Israel won Eurovision that year, if you are interested).

This was my second visit to the Forum – my first was 6 years ago, the year that the 1000 Lives Campaign was launched, and it struck me how even 2008 is starting to feel like a long time ago. Caught in the cycle of daily work it is easy to fall into the trap of thinking that nothing much changes about the issues we confront and the opportunities we have to change them. Having the opportunity to take a step back and take a different view of your own work context was a good reminder of how mistaken that is. Continue reading »

Apr 222014
 
Dr Simon Noble

Dr Simon Noble

62% of people in Wales believe that air travel is the main cause of blood clots, according to research we worked on for the Ask about Clots campaign. And it’s a damaging misconception – because there is a far greater risk of develop a clot when in hospital.

In fact, you are 1000 times more likely to develop a clot during or in the 90 days following hospital treatment. That’s why the misconception is a fatal one, because blood clots can cost lives.

Through my work with Lifeblood, we’ve tried to raise awareness that blood clots are the most common cause of preventable hospital deaths. And the more people know about clots, the more likely it is we’ll be able to prevent them.

Ask about Clots Infographic 3 Parts Continue reading »

Mar 032014
 

A member of our student community, Ilaria Pignatelli, is the Campaign Manager for Ask One Question. She tells us about their simple pledge for NHS Change Day.

Ilaria Pignatelli

Ilaria Pignatelli

We ask a lot of questions through medical school. History taking and skills practice bring up some valid questions, but are we always asking the right ones?

The thought of visiting hospital can be a scary and unpleasant experience for many patients, so after asking all the routine questions; why not ask: “What can I do to improve your stay?”

The Ask One Question campaign is doing just that. It’s a world-wide, student-led healthcare improvement initiative, encouraging students to ask their patients: “What can I do to improve your stay?” and, when possible, act on their requests. It was started by students in Cardiff who have already gained recognition outside of Wales.1, 2 Continue reading »

Feb 252014
 

Marc Franklin reflects on the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s National Forum in Florida, and thinks about some of the lessons he left with.

Joshua Kovoor, Dr Andy Carson-Stevens, Marc Franklin, Don Berwick, Gney Mehta, Amy Butlin, Hope Ward, and Beth McIldowie at the IHI Open School Congress

Above: Joshua Kovoor, Dr Andy Carson-Stevens, Marc Franklin, Don Berwick, Gney Mehta, Amy Butlin, Hope Ward, and Beth McIldowie at the IHI Open School Congress

Just before Christmas, along with  five other members of the 1000 Lives Student and Educator Community and the Cardiff Medics Student-Patient Chapter, I headed for Orlando, Florida to attend the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s 25th Annual National Forum on Quality Improvement in Healthcare. We boarded the plane excited to join over 5000 other delegates, and join the discussion on patient safety and quality improvement.

We began by attending the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) Open School Chapter Congress, along with many of the Forum’s other student delegates from universities around the world. Don Berwick (President Emeritus and Senior Fellow at the IHI), who led the Congress, emphasised the importance of students approaching healthcare systems with “fresh eyes”, and the significance of students’ position as the future of healthcare.

We were then set the modest task of saving the NHS £1 billion! We worked together to put forward a suggestion for quality improvement – our idea was  moving away from the use of non-essential sterile swabs when cannulating a patient, toward the use of cheaper, non-sterile swabs. This was an idea which had the potential to make real savings, and it shows that a small change has the possibility of making a big impact. Continue reading »

Dec 172013
 
Dr Alan Willson

Dr Alan Willson

Every year I am inspired by the level and creativity of the work that is entered into the NHS Wales Awards.

The projects are diverse, covering many areas of healthcare and sometimes challenge the status quo and the accepted ways of doing things.

But all are driven by one aim; to improve the quality of patient care and experience.

Delivering quality improvement is vital to ensuring our NHS services are sustainable and meet the needs of patients. Continue reading »

Dec 162013
 
Mike Spencer

Mike Spencer

Here’s a challenge. How do we best make sure patients get person-centred care at a time when resources in the whole of the public sector are being stretched? Part of the answer lies in co-production, something that is currently being widely talked about in Wales.

 If a part of the healthcare system is outdated, cluttered, or simply not providing person-centred care, among the first to notice this will be patients. When we’re working within an already established system, it can sometimes be hard to see how things could be done differently.

Continue reading »

Nov 152013
 
Bob Hudson

Bob Hudson

I am shortly going to be leaving my role as CEO of Public Health Wales to become the new CEO of Powys Teaching Health Board. Given all the other things I have to do whilst in transition I had completing Improving Quality Together (IQT) bronze training on my list.

I am well aware that the challenges in Powys will be different to the ones I’ve faced in Public Health Wales, but I had a sense that this was something I should do before moving. Having done so I feel I now have a new string to my bow. I know that Powys is the health board with the best percentage take-up rate for IQT so far. More than a quarter of staff have completed bronze, so I feel I will be going in speaking the same language as everyone else. Continue reading »

Nov 112013
 
Dr Alan Willson

Dr Alan Willson

There is much talk of ‘co-production’ in public services these days. The idea is that if you allow the people who use the service at least an equal role in designing and managing it, you end up with a much better service.

This is a change of mindset which relies on professionals letting go some control and learning new skills.

But as the recently launched nocturnal home renal dialysis service in Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board (ABMUHB) shows, this approach really can be better than the way we usually work. Continue reading »

Oct 282013
 
Alison Strode

Alison Strode

Over 4,500 Allied Health Professionals (AHPs) work in NHS Wales and there are a significant number working in other public services in Wales, including social care and education and in the private and charitable sectors. AHPs are part of multi-disciplinary team across the country, and are increasingly involved at the interface between primary and secondary care.With the increased emphasis on a common language and consistent approach to improvement in NHS Wales, it is very important for all AHPs to understand how to lead or support quality improvement initiatives.

1000 Lives Plus has published a new version of its Quality Improvement Guide, specifically aimed at AHPs. It contains some examples of how the improvement methodology has been applied in physiotherapy and dietetics. Continue reading »