Apr 172014
 
Kate Carnegie

Kate Carnegie

What can we learn from patients telling their story? Taking the time to ask a simple question can make all the difference.

On the evening of March 17th, Cardiff’s Ask One Question Committee representatives came together to present our findings on the patient experience.

Ask One Question is a world-wide, student-led healthcare improvement initiative, encouraging students to ask their patients: “What can I do to improve your stay?” Continue reading »

Jan 292014
 
Mike Davidge

Mike Davidge

It’s very difficult to empty a bath without pulling out the plug, especially if the taps are still on.

That’s a useful analogy to bear in mind when we are thinking about the pressures on A&E departments, particularly as we head into winter with the dreaded ‘winter pressures’.

But would you be surprised to know that demand for A&E services doesn’t vary much with seasons and certainly doesn’t spike in the winter? So, where do all those delays come from? Continue reading »

Jan 132014
 
Jan Davies

Jan Davies

We know from international learning the value and importance of developing a common improvement language. This helps us to communicate within NHS Wales about how we can make real, worthwhile and lasting change happen.

And that’s the point of Improving Quality Together: making worthwhile changes. Often, changing the little niggles people have every day, which they feel is stopping them doing their job properly, can make a huge difference. It can free up staff time, and make the system we work in a lot more effective and efficient.

But we also need to know that the change we’re making is a worthwhile one, so Improving Quality Together helps us to think about how we test these ideas for change on a small scale before going bigger. Continue reading »

Jan 312013
 
Jan Davies

Jan Davies

I recently heard nurse lecturer Austin Thomas speak about his experience of 30 operations after barely surviving a near-fatal road accident. His verdict was that many people working in the NHS say that the patient is the most important person. But when you are a patient it doesn’t feel that way.

How can we change the way we deliver services to ensure they genuinely meet the needs of the people who use them? Listening to patients is one way that seems so obvious, but we don’t always have a good track record of doing this. Maybe it’s the fear of only hearing one point of view, which may not be enough to build a service on – but hearing one voice has to better than hearing none at all. Continue reading »