Nov 182014
 

 

Dr Ruth Hussey MBE

Dr Ruth Hussey OBE

Redesigning Healthcare – Learning from the Nuka system of care to inform the development of healthcare in NHS Wales is the latest white from 1000 Lives Improvement which is being launched today at the NHS Wales National Learning Event in Swansea. There are some very important lessons for us to learn from it about how we involve people in the design and delivery of care.

The Nuka System of Care developed by Southcentral Foundation in Alaska is recognised as one of the most successful and innovative primary care systems in the world. Its success is down to a pioneering community-led model of ‘customer-ownership’, in which users provide regular feedback to inform the development of services that more effectively meet their needs.

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Nov 182014
 
Matt Wyatt

Matt Wyatt

Population health has been defined as “the health outcomes of a group of individuals, including the distribution of such outcomes within the group”.[1]

I think that’s a bit dry! I like to think of population health at the scale of a community; with a diverse interaction of people who support one and other to respond, adapt and flourish in the face of life’s challenges. For me, the impact is all about people living better and for longer, within their chosen community.

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Apr 072014
 
Ruth Hussey

Lloyd Evans

Clots. A word many have heard of, but I wonder how many understand the effect this five-letter word has on the health and wellbeing of our population.  The answer according to the Ask about Clots campaign launched last week: not enough!

As a final-year medical student approaching the start of a career within the NHS, I attended the launch of Ask about Clots with the realisation that in a little over four months, this topic would well and truly be hitting me square in the face.  Despite years of lectures, tutorials, and clinical attachments, I was taken aback by the facts: Continue reading »

Dec 192013
 
Sian Bolton

Sian Bolton

The impact of poverty and inequality in our society is clearly seen in the field of healthcare. There is a significant difference in the life expectancy of the most deprived and least deprived people in our society – over a decade in some areas.

One factor in this is healthcare provision. Services in more deprived areas tend to be less effective in identifying illness and helping people look after their health, than those services in less deprived areas. This is known as the ‘inverse care law’.

The inverse care law is based on work done here in Wales by Dr Julian Tudor-Hart back in the 1960s that looked at inequities in health care. He noted that the most deprived people with the most health needs were the ones who least accessed services from a health point of view. Continue reading »