Dec 232014
 
Tracey Cooper

Tracey Cooper

What does work to improve care for patients with leg ulcers, a service that listens to the needs of older people in care homes and a special centre to treat alcohol related injuries have in common?

All these innovations, which were developed by healthcare staff and are making a big difference to patient care, were winners in the NHS Wales Awards earlier this year.

And with just over five weeks until the closing date for entries into next year’s Awards, I can’t wait to see the latest creativity being delivered by staff and students across NHS Wales to transform care for patients.

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Dec 092014
 
Peter Bradley

Professor Peter Bradley

There are several strategic-level concepts being discussed across NHS Wales right now – ideas like prudent healthcare, co-production, and shared decision making. These promise to be transformational – not just changing what services NHS Wales delivers, but how they are delivered as well.

The key theme in all these big ideas is closer partnership working between the people delivering healthcare and the people using the services. But how does this work in practice? How can we take abstract ideas and make them a reality?

Recently, I chaired Empowering Communities to Better Health, a fascinating online seminar on how to engage with people to produce healthier communities. This was a truly international occasion – hosted here in Wales with contributors from New Zealand and the USA.

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Feb 202014
 
Paul Gimson

Paul Gimson

Imagine what a primary care service might look like if we gave the patients the money and asked them to design it themselves. This was the story I heard recently at a presentation given by the Southcentral Foundation, a citizen-owned health-service provider based in Anchorage, Alaska.

The presentation was at a recent event in Cardiff looking at Southcentral Foundation’s Nuka system of primary care. It’s ‘A customer-owner driven overhaul of a bureaucratic system centrally controlled, to one in which the local people are in control.’ It is the use of this term customer-owner which is one of the most striking features of the Nuka system.

The idea of a patient as a customer might feel wrong in the context of the NHS, but in this case the term represented a shift from a service designed around a medical model to one where the patient’s needs were put first. The provocative question for us is, if we considered patients as customers would that improve the experience of being a patient in NHS Wales? Continue reading »

Nov 152013
 
Bob Hudson

Bob Hudson

I am shortly going to be leaving my role as CEO of Public Health Wales to become the new CEO of Powys Teaching Health Board. Given all the other things I have to do whilst in transition I had completing Improving Quality Together (IQT) bronze training on my list.

I am well aware that the challenges in Powys will be different to the ones I’ve faced in Public Health Wales, but I had a sense that this was something I should do before moving. Having done so I feel I now have a new string to my bow. I know that Powys is the health board with the best percentage take-up rate for IQT so far. More than a quarter of staff have completed bronze, so I feel I will be going in speaking the same language as everyone else. Continue reading »